Part 1. Ouch, I didn’t write it down! Where have I read this?

You are enthusiastically throwing yourself heart and soul into the archival documents that seem relevant. You are so glad about a possibility to find an ancestor or relative. You are bitterly disappointed to have looked through something without finding useful data. And you celebrate your success if you have found a new ancestor. Amongst all these emotions you may forget to write down the number of the microfilm, the title of the book, the url of the page. Later – believe me, you won’t remember – you can rack your brains or work twice.

How to avoid it:

It is best to always immediately an very precisely list on your computer or in a notebook the title of the book or the archival reference code of the document

  • which you requested for research in an archive
  • which you plan to read
  • which you have read, noting also the page number of a hit
  • which you have copied (it is very annoying to have one page of a register without knowing the year, isn’t it…)
  • which you started and want to finish
  • which you know is relevant or not worth to look at anymore
  • which you heard about and want to discover next.

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We wish you the best of luck in your research,

Judit and István

Historia Translation

www.historiatranslation.com

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P.S. Have you found a Hungarian, Latin or German text and don't know whether it is worth translating? We can make you an abstract from it! You can learn who wrote it and to whom, when and where it was written, as well as what it’s about, so that you can decide whether or not you want to have it translated. For details, see our webpage: http://historiatranslation.com/abstract/.

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Topics from reading Latin, German and Hungarian manuscripts to genealogy, microhistory, research and heraldry.